Currently Browsing: Perceptions of Social Care

Communicating with Refugees – Points to Consider

  There is much being written online about how we communicate with refugees and what is best. I personally believe as long as we keep trying all the options something will work with someone. Off course feedback from colleagues what works is essential. I thought today’s post could be about what I have found in my search for answers to help in training workers and volunteers. Technology – the use of mobile phones and social media have been found to be a great way of reaching out and connecting with people especially in the camps, shown by the UNHCR initiative. Information technology is also a great way of extending the reach of education projects. Education with the poor resources and lack of teachers is a constant concern using technology we may find a way to combat it. Although provision of the relevant equipment is also necessary – maybe some of the bigger corporations could fund this? Apple, IBM are you listening? Language cards – simple but very effective. A London based company has some downloadable communication cards in six languages designed by Tobii Dynavox these can be downloaded in PDF form directly from the company website . Interested in contributing to these communication boards then head of to Boardmaker Online and register with them. Improving our interpersonal skills both verbal and nonverbal. Next post I will look more specifically at...

Computers, Conundrums and Aid

Whatever we think of the internet age, it is here and it is here to stay. Given that, we need to mobilise resources and ensure everyone has access and knowledge to that technology. One group that does this is Computer Aid. This excellent organisation has been around since 1998 and  reaches out around the globe to empower people by internet connectivity and promotion of sustainable solar power.  Last month I treated myself, well via a Ferratum loan, to a new laptop and ipad – both desperately required in my work and life and I then donated my long time friend to the Computer Aid knowing that it would be of use. This had a knock effect when I told family and friends who all had some IT tech hanging around in garages or bedrooms. So in the end my donation multiplied to over 20, so feeling quite proud myself. It really is amazing how people will help but they often need that small push, my family and friends did not see the need to find out if there was a social need for their not needed things. I find it is often the case but point it out at a social level and the response can be amazing. People have the capacity to offer so much but I think they get tired of being bombarded with requests and become blind to certain things because it is in their face too much. It’s a conundrum, say to much and you bore people, they switch off; say to little and they don’t get the information to make informed choice. Whats the answer??? One of the areas that Computer Aid work in is with refugees, reconnecting them to family &  friends, introducing them to online training and the wider world. One of my concerns is how we assist the refugees that come to us, these displaced, damaged and traumatised people. A role for any social worker/carer is to help these people integrate into our society in a positive way. That means educating and helping the other professionals involved as much as it does dealing directly with the people and children themselves. It is also about learning to work with other professionals in the other countries especially when we are dealing with the care of children.  I think the subject is worth a post of its own as their are so many issues to consider, not only the refugee but the people and professionals who are trying to help. Send me feedback via the comments if you want to contribute to this or any discussion on this blog but I am especially interested in anyone who is currently assisting with refugees and what we can do to help them grieve their loss and integrate into our societies with dignity and pride...

Do You View The World From A Half Full Or Half Empty Glass?

Do You View The World From A Half Full Or Half Empty Glass? Social care means many things to many people. To politicians its a platform for them to get elected (cynical I know but true?); professionals in all sectors struggle in an every decreasing economic climate, suffocating within rules and guidelines that are there to protect both them and clients but so often fail both; the private sector motivations are many fold, good intentions and good deeds and good conscious can all equate to good advertising and good marketing; private individuals and NGO’s are constantly evolving and changing as the need dictates but are often ‘after the fact”. All of this can read very depressingly but I am an optimist not a “half empty cup” type of person. I believe collectively we can bring about change and care about our fellow man. This blog is about that aspect, I want to look at the social care that is in existence that is working and what we can learn from it to carry into the future. Too often the cry of ‘not enough’ is heard and the other favourite of course is’ “there is no money”. Well that all might be true but still we try and we make differences small and large. So don’t lose hope, focus on what can and is being achieved, small steps can lead us a long way. If interested have a look these ‘optimistic’ quotes that are always on a sticker on my fridge, http://www.terrystarbucker.com/2008/09/29/my-10-favorite-half-full-quotes-reprised/. My most favourite quote though is by an American Scientist, Margaret Mead (1901-1978), “Never believe that a few caring people can’t change the world. For, indeed, that’s all who ever have.” I first came across her when I was a student nurse and it resonated with me then and still does today.  As it all applies to this blog I want to share the events and people who are making positive contributions to social care and I ask that you share them too, write to me, comment, tell me what you...